Words

When I think of the examination of words, I think of little legos.  Not the standard size mind you, the teeny weeny ones that you use to build pirate ships and castles.  My son and my wife always had the patience to dig through a colossal pile of reduce-sized bricks to build the statues.  When I read a dictionary (yes, you read that right), I probably get the same head rush.

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One half of our OED

I’m currently reading ‘Word By Word’ by Kory Stamper.  It’s got some laughs in store for you if you like arguing about language (not punctuation; those people are weird).

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The Talking Mail Box

A Talking Mailbox- Oh My, How Useful!

Read, Seen, Heard

I have no idea why the Talking Mailbox didn’t catch on. This publicity photo is said to be from 1943, taken in California, and the young lovely listening to the mailbox is Lynn Baggett, whose story is a cautionary tale for young women with stars in their eyes. Miss Baggett was “discovered” at the age of 19 by a Warner Brothers talent scout while walking to work in downtown Dallas, and came to Los Angeles where she landed a movie contract and appeared in 24 films.

She was, however, credited in only three of them. She is remembered in some circles as a beautiful but silent waitress in Mildred Pierce (1945), as a jilted beauty in Douglas Sirk’s Lured (1947), and as the widow Mrs. Philips in the film noir D.O.A. (1950).

Her real role was as a studio beauty. Playwright Arthur Laurents said of her: “She was very sweet…

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Have Cancels Been Canceled?

I admit, I’ve noticed for years that many postal items appear to be uncancelled.  That is to say, the stamps appear to be non-cancelled.  I chalked it up to some nifty “invisible” cancel, that the postal scanners would recognize, and kick any mailpiece that utilized a stamp already used.  Too futuristic?

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Well, that may not be the case.  In my short time digging online, this discussion points more toward the stamps simply overlooked by the machinery.  Now, if my miserly ways compelled me to break the law and reuse said postage (an act I would never consider), I assume the result would be another delivered missive.

Are the machines at fault?  Is the postal volume too high for proper checks?  COMMENTS WELCOME!

Oh well, in the meantime, I’ll soak these suckers and place them in the sort bin.  Thanks to the Erie Stamp Club for these fine mini-blocks.  ~TH~

Let’s Have Fun With Words

I’m currently reading a book checked out from the library, Word By Word by Kory Stamper.  So far it’s delightful.  It reminded me to pull two books down from the shelves here at home; The Joy Of Lex and More Joy Of Lex.

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For you youngsters out there, the two books on the right were titled as a play on words of two popular books of that era, The Joy of Sex.  Both of the books on lexicography were published in the early 80s.  When my girlfriend (now my wife) and I were out at a bookstore, I found the first book.  We both enjoyed it very much.  It’s filled with etymology descriptions, but it also strains your brain a bit by tossing appropriate puzzles at you.

I knew that the blue cover follow up existed, but I had a devil of a time finding it; pre internet don’t you know.  But perseverance prevailed.

If you enjoy wordplay, or simply like to bandy new vocabulary words about your tongue, I recommend these titles.  You can get your paws on them easily nowadays.