Inanimate Introvert (typecast)

Crap off the top of my pointed little head.  JPEG below.

PDF here – scan0001.

introvert

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Buried In Poetry

In January, I began reading poetry incessantly.  Since I tend to write 8-12  poems per week, I figured I should start reviewing the greats, contemporaries of the greats, and contemporary (modern?) poets.

Now that it’s National Poetry Month, I have redoubled my efforts.  My twitter feed is chock-a-block with links to poetry I’ve never read before.  My office is piled with books, handy at a moments notice.  I’m reviewing T.S. Eliot, Benét, Don Marquis, and James Thurber (Thurber wasn’t a poet, but he always makes me laugh; my wife has a standing order that when I fall into my first coma, she is to read Thurber to me incessantly).

I found a fine hardbound book at the local used bookstore recently, The Bellman Book Of Verses, 1906-1919.  Many fine poems here amid the ones that simply don’t speak to me.  That is, not my cup of tea.

Well, isn’t that the way with poetry, art, music and literature?  When a bit of art is revered, it’s not a bad idea to observe it on your own and attempt to suss out why it is revered.  Of course, you can look at post analysis and comparative studies to find out what the fuss is all about.  As I have tromped about gracelessly on this planet, I have discovered a wonderful escape hatch which I use often.

I Immerse myself in a style or genre for a little while.  One that is just a bit outside of my own established interests.  There’s no real work involved.  Just read, or observe, or listen to that art, attempting to experience what others might.  My brain begins to make connections, revealing overlaps.  I’ll know when I think to myself, “Hey, that kinda reminds me of X”.

When I’m studying poetry, I know I already have an established feather bed to fall into if things get weird.  I can read 3 consecutive modern poems that do not rev me up.  No need to be disillusioned.  I can always rinse my brain’s mouth out with  Kipling.  Or Browning.  And in dire emergencies, break glass to access James Thurber.

Happy hunting fellow poets.  ~Tom~

AR – 1ip 5ervice

AR – 1ip 5ervice

my father called his wallet a billfold

simply put a portable engagement

for goods and services

our n.r.a. has a billfold too

simply put a stable lobby

for goods and services

guised as rights (by god no less)

you are folded under leather

with no haggling in the street

with no argument for debate

           you are wrong

           they are right

          — i never feared the paper tiger

                                           — until now

 

The U.S. Census

census_early.jpg

Well, if ever I wanted to open a full can of wrigglin’ worms, the history of the U.S. Census would rate high.  I have been delving back into my own family history lately, and any researcher of that ilk will tell you that the life blood of many a new branch on the family tree begins with the census.

I will not attempt to scrawl an in depth history of the census.  You can do that yourself.  However, here are some fun links I recently found about what it’s like to be a census taker.  You know, way back before computers, and beyond.

What Did A ’40s Census-Taker Look Like? — Here you have a brief article from LIFE magazine.  The photos are posed, but they convey a great deal about what life was like in middle America coming out of the 30’s.

Here we have an article from AOL – yes!  AOL!  From 2010, this article will give you some indication of how antiquated the fact gathering system was, even in 2010.  DISCLAIMER: If this link is broken when you click it, don’t come cryin’ to me…

Here I leave you with a swell link to the actual Census Bureau website. Fascinating stuff!  On the left margin are links to facts about the progression of how the census changed over time.  As you might imagine, many folks have looked upon census takers as intruders, bent on collecting information for nefarious purposes.  In actuality, the census was conceived and perpetuated so the people of the United States can be fairly represented.  If you disagree with that perspective well, that’s your right.  I highly suggest however, that if the census man comes to your door, ask questions first.  Better yet; answer the questions.  ~TH~

So Anyway… The West Wing

I really like The West Wing.  Yes, now that it’s over, it’s fairly easy to punch holes into it.  But wow, what great writing.

I always enjoyed the tension between Danny ConCannon and C.J. Craig.  Low and behold, I’m watching the film Stripes (because that shit is funny), and who do I recognize in the scene?  The scene where some pleeb fires a mortar rocket at the observation deck where Sgt. Hulka is standing?  Yep.  Danny ConCannon.

 

So anyway… Brian Epstein

So anyway,

I’m daydreaming the other day, thinking about the Beatles.  Who was their first manager? Immediately the name Buddy Ebsen  pops into my mind.  I know of course that this is incorrect.  Still, I let this montage of silliness take it’s course.

Yep.  Jed Clampett is now the founder of a british invasion pop music group.  Weeeeell doggie!

I will let your own mind fill in the blanks.  For the record: I did come up with Brian Epstein shortly after.  Not near as funny.  ~TH~