Garage Sales – Yay!

House sales, garage sales, flea markets.  The life blood of summer.  I was lamenting just two weeks ago that none of my friends had spotted any typewriters recently.  Then today, one nice beauty came my way from a neighbor.  Then, two more very nice machines came my way while I was at a writing workshop, thanks to my wife and son who went out to the local house sales.  All delivered right to my doorstop.  And strangely, all three are (W)Riters.

Starting with the MarxWriter

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Marx Toys began manufacturing in Girard Pennsylvania in 1934, a small town that neighbors my own small town.   This little toy is in very good condition.  As you can see, I even have the box.  This toy actually has quite a few functions found on portable typewriters.  It really will type, though it wouldn’t be my first choice for typing up a business letter.  How about those key tops!  Does that shape remind you of another collectable typewriter?  The Marx toy museum closed recently, but you can still find some great information about the history at the museum website.

Next up from today is the Smith-Corona Skyriter.

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This lady blue is in very good+ condition.  Hardly used, there are not the usual scratches in the plastic body, and no fading either.  Types like a champ.  SN – 6Y908851

Finally, the critter that my neighbor thoughtfully brought to my attention (and my doorstep); the Remington-Rand Quiet-Riter from 1956.

Types well, rugged, and everything functions as it should.  SN – QR 2954202

So there you have it.  The MarxWriter, the Skyriter and the Quiet-Riter.  Seems I was destined to punch up my Riter collection today.  $50 total for these 3 critters.   Boom baby.

~TH~

Traveling Typewriters

Today I took a few typewriters over to another house we have nearby (referred to as BRAVO – the main house as you might guess is ALPHA).  I decided to place a Smith-Corona Silent inside the typing desk.  I also took over the 1948 Royal Quiet De Luxe and my 1946 Smith-Corona Clipper.  I’ll be bouncing back and forth between the two houses over the next several weeks.  Just hate the thought of being without a typewriter.

Now I’m choosing which machines will accompany me on an upcoming writing retreat.  ~TH~

CANON For Feminists… NOT!

Well, here we go down a rabbit hole I never thought I would enter; large business machines/typewriters.  Due to a foolish glance through area craigslist-ings, I stumbled upon a business machine at a very fair price.  The seller was about an hours drive away, and the weather was perfect for a Sunday drive.

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Here we have the CANON AP-810 III.  Looks just as sexy as it sounds, right?

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I had a couple of days to research this animal before meeting up with the seller.  To my surprise, there seems to be very little information about Canon business machines on the interwebs.  That is to say, Canon typewriters from the 80s.

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Lots of printers.  Lots of copiers.  Why so little on the AP series?  These were built (I assume) to compete with the IBM Selectrics.

Like all great things from the dawn of the computer age, this thing is over-engineered, with more features than you can shake a stick at.  And all clearly explained in the manuals (assuming you’re one of the engineers who designed the thing).

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Be sure to read the copy.  Then take a shower.  Gah!

I can just hear the girlish giggling as the boss-man presented this new machine for his dainty workforce to figure out.  I know he wasn’t going to train them on it.  He had an important three martini meeting to get to!

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This beast was presented to the business world in 1984 by my estimation.  Gloria Steinem first published Ms. Magazine in 1972.  Twelve years later?  Um… uh…

Uh-oh.

~TH~

 

Smith Corona SL480-Eureka!

My recent acquisition of a 1992 Smith-Corona SL480, and a EUREKA moment. I pulled the ribbon cart out and closed the lid- noticed that the critter would still type. Hmmm… If my ribbon cart runs out while I’m in the field (with electricity), I can simply load two sheets with a carbon in the middle. True, it then becomes an invisible, but hey! I can still type! Carry those carbons folks! ~TH~